10 tips to help you pass the MRCGP AKT exam

Dr Mahibur RahmanMRCGP AKT Courses The MRCGP AKT exam is a challenging exam, testing applied knowledge relevant to UK general practice. In this article, Dr Mahibur Rahman discusses some key tips to help you prepare for and pass the exam.

  1. Understand the basics

The exam lasts 3 hours and 10 minutes, and consists of 200 questions. 80% of the questions relate to clinical medicine, 10% to evidence based practice, and 10% the organisational domain. The exam is computerised, and there is now access to a basic on-screen calculator if needed. The majority of questions are single best answer and extended matching questions. Other formats include algorithm questions, short answer (you type the correct answer into a box), video questions, and picture based questions.

  1. Fail to prepare, prepare to fail

Allow enough time to revise all material in the exam – most candidates need 3 or 4 months to be able to cover everything sufficiently well to pass the exam. We help a lot of candidates prepare when they are resitting the exam – a common finding amongst candidates that failed the exam is that they had not realised how long it would take to prepare, and did not have enough time to complete their revision. The curriculum is large and covers a broad range of topics – try to have a systematic approach to allow you to cover all the important topics adequately. The RCGP has produced an AKT topic review which details the key areas and subjects covered in the exam.  The MPS has produced a more concise checklist of key topics that frequently feature in the exam as part of their free MRCGP Study Guide.

  1. Focus on the clinical domain

Aim to spend the majority of your revision focusing on the clinical domain – this makes up 80% of the marks and questions (160 questions). Someone who scored very poorly in this area (under 60%) would usually fail the exam – even with 100% in the other domains. Overall, a poor score in this domain is the most common cause of failure in the AKT exam. This domain also takes the longest amount of time to cover as the bulk of the curriculum is focused on clinical topics. Questions from the clinical domain can include those relating to making a diagnosis, ordering and interpreting tests, disease factors and risks, and management. It is important to have a good knowledge of key guidelines – NICE, SIGN, BTS etc. for common and important disease areas as they are frequently tested.

  1. Revise core statistics and evidence based practice

10% of the exam is evidence based medicine, including basic statistics, graphs and charts and types of study. These offer easy marks if you make sure you have a good grasp of the basic concepts and can interpret common charts and graphs. Make sure you can calculate averages (mean, mode, median), numbers needed to treat, sensitivity and specificity as well as understanding absolute and relative risk, odds ratios, p values, 95% confidence intervals and standard deviation. You should be able to interpret scatter plots, L’Abbe plots, Forest plots, funnel plots as well as Cates plots. Finally, you should be able to understand the usage of common study types including cross sectional surveys, case control studies, cohort studies and randomised controlled trials.

  1. Don’t forget the organisational domain

This makes up another 10% of the exam, and is the area that candidates tend to do worst on. These areas can be dull to read, but learning about practice management, QOF, certification, DVLA guidelines and legal duties of doctors will not only get you easy marks, it will be useful when you qualify.

  1. Learn from other people’s mistakes

Read through the examiners’ feedback reports to see which topics caused trainees problems, as they are usually retested in the next few exams. Having analysed every feedback report published so far, it is interesting to note that the same subjects get featured repeatedly! In the last feedback report, there was not a single topic that had not already featured as an area of poor performance in a previous report.

  1. Make the most of your revision time

Effective revision should combine reading with practising questions. Try to practise questions to time, as time pressure is a big issue with this exam – you have about 57 seconds for each question! If you get a question wrong, try to read more broadly about the subject to gain a deeper understanding. By relating it to a question you have just answered, you are more likely to retain the information. Concentration drops dramatically after an hour, so try to revise in chunks of no more than an hour at a time. Take a short break – even 10 minutes to make a hot drink, or get some fresh air is often enough to refresh you and improve concentration for the next burst of revision.

  1. Learn the subject, not the question

Some candidates approach AKT revision by picking an online revision service and then go through all the questions multiple times. This can lead to a false sense of security and ultimately failure in the exam. Repeating the SAME questions multiple times provides very little additional benefit. Often complex questions such as data interpretation are answered the second time by remembering the pattern rather than understanding the subject. In the exam, you will not get the same question, but a different one testing knowledge of the subject. While your mark will improve with each repeated attempt at the same questions, your knowledge may have only improved marginally (having seen the correct answers the first time, it is not surprising that you get most of them correct the next time). A better approach is to read up on the subjects and explanations after doing a set of questions, and then once you complete all the questions, move on to a different set of questions from a different service or book. This will give you a better idea of how well you have understood the topic and retained the knowledge.

  1. Read the question carefully

Many candidates that have a good knowledge base still fail the AKT by a few marks. This can be owing to poor exam technique. It is really important to read the question carefully to prevent losing marks for silly mistakes. This can relate to the instructions – some questions ask you to drag the right answer into a certain part of the screen. Clicking the right answer instead of dragging it will gain no marks. It is important to watch out for and to understand certain keywords – if the question asks for a characteristic feature, it means it is there in almost every case (90% or more) – whereas if it asks for a feature that is commonly seen in a condition, it only needs to be there in around 60% or more of cases. Some questions are negatively framed – “which of the following is not part of the Rome III criteria for diagnosing irritable bowel syndrome?” – candidates that fail to spot the “not” in this question could easily select the wrong answer despite knowing the Rome III criteria.

  1. Keep to time

To complete the entire paper, you have just 57 seconds per question. Try to be disciplined – if you are not entirely sure of the best answer, it is better to put down your best guess after about 55 seconds and move on. You can flag questions for review, so you could try to come back if you finish a little early to look at those are unsure of. By being strict with your time, you will at least pick up all the easy marks for topics that you have covered in your revision. Candidates that spend 2-3 minutes struggling with a few really challenging questions often end up unable to complete the paper. They may have missed easy marks from questions at the end of the paper that they did not see. It is useful to have some pace checkpoints – try to finish 33 questions every 30 minutes. At this pace, you will have completed 66 questions after 1 hour, 99 at 1.5 hours, and complete the whole paper with just under 10 minutes left to go over any questions flagged earlier.

Summary The MRCGP AKT is a challenging exam with a significant failure rate – over 1 in 4 candidates fail each exam, with the long term mean pass rate around 73%. It covers a large curriculum, so it is important to allow enough time and to have a plan to enable you to prepare in a systematic way. A lot of the knowledge gained from preparing will help you not only in everyday practice, but also for the MRCGP CSA examination. By mixing reading with practice questions, you should have both the knowledge and the exam technique to allow you to pass well.

Dr Mahibur Rahman is a portfolio GP and a consultant in medical education. He has been the medical director of Emedica since 2005 and has taught over 20,000 delegates preparing for GP entry exams, MRCGP and on GP careers. He teaches an intensive 1 day MRCGP AKT preparation course in London, Birmingham and Manchester that covers all 3 domains. The course includes key theory and high yield topics, exam technique as well as mock exams in timed conditions. You can get a £25 discount by using the code passmrcgp

Details of the course are available at http://courses.emedica.co.uk/acatalog/nMRCGP_AKT_Preparation.html

MRCGP AKT Course

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MRCGP AKT revision – test your knowledge with these 5 AKT questions from the organisational domain

The organisational domain is the area that candidates get the lowest average in the MRCGP AKT exam – it covers a wide range of subjects so can be difficult to prepare for. Test your knowledge with these 5 organisational questions – you can read the answers by MRCGP AKT Revisionclicking the link at the bottom of this post.

1. A 44 year old woman presents with a suspected breast lump.  She accepts the offer of a chaperone during the examination, and a healthcare assistant is present throughout the examination.  With regards to the medical record, which ONE of the following is correct?

A. The fact that a chaperone was present does not need to be noted.

B. The fact that a chaperone was present should be noted, along with their identity (including name and job role).

C. The fact that a chaperone was present should be noted, but no further details are necessary.

D. The fact that a chaperone was present should be noted, along with their job title only.

E. Details of the chaperone should be noted only with the chaperone’s permission.

 

2. One of your patients asks if her daughter has been prescribed the oral contraceptive pill. Her daughter is 14, and was seen on her own a week earlier, and prescribed the combined oral contraceptive pill by one of the other doctors in the practice. Which of the following is the most suitable action?

A. Provide information if the mother has parental responsibility.

B. Explain that you are unable to disclose information without the daughter’s permission.

C. Explain that her daughter is taking contraception but that you cannot divulge details of the exact prescription.

D. Advise the mother to put in a request to access the notes in writing.

E. Provide full details as the mother has a right to know.

 

3. Regarding sharing confidential information relating to knife wounds, which of the following statements is incorrect?

A. In some cases, the name and address of the patient need not be disclosed to the police when initially contacting them.

B. You should usually let the patient know if you are contacting the police.

C. Details of all patients that present with a knife wound should be reported to the police.

D. Where there is a risk of serious harm to others, you can disclose details to the police even if the patient refuses consent.

E. In some cases it is acceptable to disclose confidential details without first seeking the patient’s consent or letting them know you are contacting the police.

 

4. You receive a request for a medical report based on a patient’s notes from an insurance company. The request includes signed consent from the patient to allow you to provide this information. The patient contacts you asking to see a copy of the report before it is sent to the insurance company. The patient does not have any significant medical problems. What is the most appropriate way to deal with this request?

A. Contact the insurance company and request their permission to give the patient a copy of the report.

B. Tell the patient that he should request a copy from the insurance company.

C. Tell the patient that it is not possible for him to see the report, but that he can request access to his own records.

D. Provide a copy of the report to the patient before sending the original to the insurance company.

E. Provide a copy of the report to the patient after sending the original to the insurance company.

 

5. How long must a practice retain confidential electronic medical records after a patient registered at the practice dies?

A. 5 years

B. 10 years

C. 20 years

D. 25 years

E. Indefinitely

Read the answers and explanations and see how you scored!

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MRCGP AKT exam format and key changes to the exam

MRCGP AKT RevisionDr Mahibur Rahman

The MRCGP AKT exam was introduced in 2007 as part of the new MRCGP examination. Since then it has been through a few minor changes relating to question formats and the passing standard. From October 2014, some important changes are being implemented. This article looks at the exam format, including the new changes.

Exam basics

The Applied Knowledge Test (AKT) is one part of the MRCGP examination. It can be taken in the ST2 year of training or later. It is a computerised test consisting of 200 questions, and can be attempted a maximum of 4 times. The major change being implemented in 2014 is that the time allowed for the exam is being increased by 10 minutes – candidates will now have 3 hours and 10 minutes to complete the exam. The other change is a minor one – an on screen calculator will be available if needed.

Exam content

The exam is based around UK general practice, with all questions being drawn from areas within the RCGP GP curriculum. The breakdown of the questions are as follows:

  • 80% (160 questions) – clinical medicine relevant to general practice
  • 10% (20 questions) – organisational – this includes administrative issues, medicolegal, practice management, GP contract, certification etc.
  • 10% (20 questions) – evidence based practice – statistics, types of study, graphs and charts etc.

Question formats

The majority of questions (about 90%) are of two formats – extended matching questions (EMQs) and single best answer questions (SBA). Candidates sitting the AKT will be familiar with this type of question from the GP Stage 2 assessments used as part of GP recruitment. The remaining question formats include:

  • Algorithm question – testing knowledge of specific guidelines or protocols – sometimes you will be required to drag the correct answer into the relevant box.
  • Picture question – this will have a scenario with a related image – ranging from an investigation, blood result, audiogram, skin lesion, otoscopy or a photo of a clinical sign.
  • Video question – this will involve a short clip (20 – 30 seconds) with a relevant question. This could show an abnormal gait, a test for a sign, a physical abnormality etc.
  • Seminal trial – this will test knowledge of a specific trial that has had a significant impact on general practice.
  • Rank ordering question – this is a relatively new format, and will ask you to order options from best to worst e.g. most secure password to least secure password
  • Short answer question – this will provide a question and then a blank space into which you have to type the correct answer. Typically the answer will be one or two words.
  • Calculation – this may involve calculating a paediatric drug dosage, converting one opioid to a different formulation, or working out the sensitivity or specificity of a test. The maths is usually limited to basic arithmetic, although an no screen calculator is now available.

Preparation

The AKT is a challenging exam, and most candidates will need at least 3 months revision to be able to cover the entire curriculum thoroughly. Combining reading with practising exam level questions to time will help make your revision more effective. The Emedica AKT preparation course offers comprehensive coverage of the curriculum, with a focus on the challenging areas highlighted by examiners from previous sittings. This includes statistics and evidence based practise made simple, the organisational domain, and over 100 core clinical topics including high yield topics from previous examinations. You can get a £20 discount by using the code alumnimrcgp

Useful links:

RCGP AKT Content Guide

MRCGP AKT tips for effective preparation – from a registrar with the highest score in the country

MRCGP CSA Exam Feedback and Summary – February 2012 exams

MRCGP CSA Exam Feedback and Summary – February 2012 exams

Dr Mahibur Rahman

After each MRCGP CSA examination, the examiners release a report highlighting key information from the last exam. This includes pass marks and rates for the sitting, along with the number of candidates sitting the exam. Since the February 2012 exam they also started releasing a feedback report highlighting key areas that candidates found challenging.

These topics are likely to continue to feature in future CSA sittings, as there is a common case bank, so it is worth ensuring that you have a good understanding of how to tackle them.

If you are thinking of sitting the MRCGP CSA in November 2012 or January / February 2013, then you have probably started preparing. As the January / February sitting is the most popular each year, we thought it would be helpful to look at the feedback and challenging areas from this sitting in 2012. The sumary report for the May 2012 CSA exam is not yet available.

Key facts from the February 2012 MRCGP CSA exam:

Number of candidates: 2074

Proportion sitting the CSA for the first time: 92.5%

Overall pass rate: 71.8% (1490 candidates passed, 584 candidates failed)

The top score was 111 out of 117
The mean score was 81 out of 117
The lowest score was 37 out of 117
97 candidates (4.7%) scored 100 or more out of 117
67 candidates (3.2%) scored 20 or more marks below the pass mark.

Challenging areas

The examiners’ report from the February 2012 diet of the MRCGP CSA exam was released in April, and highlighted the following areas that caused candidates difficulty:

Genetics in primary care

Cases involving genetics regularly cause CSA candidates problems in the exam. Examples of cases you should be prepared to handle include:

Prenatal counselling for risk of single gene disorders – e.g. sickle cell disease, Huntington’s, neurofibromatosis, cystic fibrosis etc.

An asymptomatic patient requesting a colonoscopy with a family history of colon cancer.

While you do not need to have an in depth knowledge of specific genetic disorders, you should be able to take a good history and draw a family tree. You should also be able to explain the difference in risk for autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive disorders, and know when it is appropriate to refer to a genetics counselling service.

Examinations

In some cases in the CSA you will actually perform a physical examination. In some cases, candidates lost marks for being unable to be focused in their choice of examination, or not being able to perform the examination proficiently. Examples of a lack of focus would include requesting a full physical examination in someone with hearing loss – it would be more appropriate to examine the ears, and to perform a Rinne and Weber test. Examples of an inadequate examination highlighted by the examiners included listening to a patient’s chest with through their shirt! Most examinations in the CSA are fairly straightforward – you should try to practice all the common examinations with a study group until you are fluent. Ask your trainer to observe you and to provide feedback.

The MRCGP CSA is a challenging, comprehensive examination, so it is important that you start preparing for it early. Try to get as many observed consultations as possible with your trainer, and form a study group early on.

Further reading:
Complete February 2012 CSA Summary report

The Emedica MRCGP CSA Course includes teaching on the new CSA mark scheme including the new 2012 CSA feedback statements. Each course only takes 6 GP registrars, with a strong emphasis on practice with individual feedback. Practice sessions are donw in groups of 3, allowing each candidate to have 4 mock CSA practice cases. There is detailed, constructive 1 to 1 feedback after each case using the new marking criteria. Our mock CSA cases are done in a realistic setting with professional simulated patients and timed in the same way as the real exam. Alumni members can get a £20 discount by using the code alumnimrcgp

 

MRCGP AKT Exam – High Yield Topics from the April 2012 Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam – High Yield Topics from the April 2012 Exam

Dr Mahibur Rahman

After each MRCGP AKT examination, the examiners release a report highlighting key information from the last exam. This includes pass marks and rates, and also key topics – both those that were answered well, and those that GP trainees performed poorly on. These topics are frequently examined again in the next few sittings of the AKT exam, so it is worth ensuring that you have a good understanding of them.

As some of you may be starting your revision for the October 2012 MRCGP AKT Exam, we thought it would be helpful to look at the high yield topics from the latest examiners’ report.

Key facts from the April 2012 MRCGP AKT exam:

The top score was 93.5%
The mean score was 73.2%
The lowest score was 41%
The pass mark was 68.8%
The pass rate was 67.6%

Scores by domain:

Clinical medicine – 74.2%
Evidence interpretation – 70.2%
Organisational – 68.1%

High Yield Topics

The examiners’ report from the April 2012 diet of the MRCGP AKT exam highlighted the following key topics:

  • Prescribing for children – asthma, migraine
  • Normal childhood development
  • Data interpretation / statistics
  • Confidentiality – insurance reports / ABI / BMA guidance
  • Nice Hypertension guidelines 2011 – diagnosis and treatment
  • Spirometry – interpreting results
  • Cancer – 2 week referral guidelines

The MRCGP AKT is a comprehensive examinations, so it is important that you cover the entire curriculum. Remember that 80% of the marks are related to applying knowledge relating to clinical medicine in general practice, 10% to evidence interpretation and 10% to the organisational domain.

The highest scorer in the April AKT examination was Dr Razwan Ali. He attended the Emedica AKT course about a month before his exam. You can read his AKT Preparation Tips on our blog.

Emedica Alumni can get a £20 discount off the Emedica MRCGP AKT course by entering this code when booking: alumnimrcgp

Further reading:
Complete April 2012 AKT Summary report

MRCGP CSA Preparation – Tips to help you pass the MRCGP CSA exam

CSA Preparation – Tips to help you pass the MRCGP CSA exam
Dr. Safiya Virji

The MRCGP CSA examination is a challenging exam. Dr Safiya Virji sat and passed the exam on her first attempt with one of the top scores in the country. In this article she shares some tips on preparing for the CSA exam.

An important step in successfully passing the CSA is to make a decision early on which sitting to go for, and actively work towards being thoroughly prepared by this time. I made the decision six months beforehand. I had just started my ST2 placement in GP and took this opportunity to practice various consultation styles until I found one that suited me and came more naturally to me.

I ensured that I was videoed frequently from very early on and did not let the embarrassment of watching myself on the screen stop me from getting vital feedback from my trainer. I was always conscious to encourage my colleagues to give constructive criticism so that I had identified specific points to improve over the coming weeks. I also gradually reduced my consultation times; starting at 20 minutes and gradually working down to 10 minutes about two months before the exam.

I found joint surgeries with my trainer and other partners at the surgery extremely beneficial. Not only can you see alternative ways of phrasing things, but it also gives you a chance to see how you are inclined to perform when you don’t know who or what is going to come through the door and you are being watched. Conducting these on a weekly basis meant by the time the exam came, I was already comfortable with the scenario of being watched conducting consultations I was not familiar with, so was less nervous then you would expect in such a weighty exam. This enabled me to perform to the best of my abilities when it really counted.

It is important to use all opportunities as exam practice. Every patient you see is an opportunity to practice explaining a diagnosis in layman’s terms or to ask about what they think may be causing their presenting complaint. Anything that goes wrong in your consultations is worth jotting down and discussing with your trainer afterwards. It could be the phrasing, or it could be bad choice of questions. I found the more that went wrong, the better I was getting, as I was prepared for all eventualities.

I was also part of the on-call rota and working on emergency patients with a seven minute consultation time from about four months before the exam. This in combination with the GP out of hours (OOH) gave an excellent opportunity to practice for the exam. I took the opportunity in OOH to ensure every patient I saw was observed by the trainer, timed and feedback was given.

I read a selection of case books including:
nMRCGP – Practice Cases, Clinical Skills Assesment – Raj Thakkar
CSA Scenarios – Thomas M Das
Consultantion Skills for the new MRCGP – P Naidoo & C. Monkley
Get Through New MRCGP: Clinical Skills Assessment – Bruno Rushforth (this was the best book for role play in my opinion)

I tried to use these for role plays with colleagues at least for a one hour session a week, increasing this to 2-3 hours a week in the last month before the exam. However, I also read these books in my own time to learn how simple presenting complaints can often have an unbelievable amount of depth, and how missing out one vital question can lead to missing the underlying point of that consultation.

Regarding examinations, I watched videos on how to do the examinations thoroughly yet quickly, and used my own equipment to perform these multiple times on family and friends in the week before the exam so examinations were fresh to hand if necessary.

In preparation for the exam, I set myself a target to complete all consultations within 8 minutes. Strict time management a month before the exam meant I was used to working at a fast enough pace that would ensure I would not over run in the exam, even with the unexpected cases which take a few seconds longer.
I ensured I was always trying to examine the patient by 5mins, and always kept a note of the start and finish time of each consultation to ensure I was always working to time.
In the exam, on several occasions I was still conversing with the patient when the bell rang. However, it seemed I covered enough material at the end of the 10 mins to pass well on each station.

Having sat the exam before all my colleagues, I was not exposed to many horror stories about the exam. This meant I was optimistic when exam time came. A combination of this, alongside minimal nerves and trying my best to apply a structure that worked for me when things were going to plan, and adapting my consulting style when I needed to be flexible, plus a happy face, lead to my passing with a score of 106/117. And I forgot to mention, when I sat the exam I was 38weeks pregnant!

One month before the exam I went on several courses, one of which was the Emedica MRCGP CSA course. I found the course useful as it tackled preparation slightly differently to other courses. The group was very small (courses take just 6 candidates per day). This meant there was time to focus on each trainee independently and specific feedback was given on their performance. By the time you go on any course, you have usually had experience of the simple well known cases, but the scenarios at the Emedica course were slightly more complex then average which meant you were prepared for the more challenging cases in the real exam.

Some of the cases in the CSA do throw you so having some practice at performing under pressure can mean the difference between a pass and fail. The feedback on the course was very useful as it was not based just around what was done well, but more on what needed to be improved on in order for you to pass, and pass well. For me, this approach was more beneficial as I always maintained the attitude that by taking constructive criticism on board, I was far more likely to pass as all my flaws would be ironed out by the time the exam came round. After the course, further reading material and links were provided, including videos of common examinations. This was very helpful as though it is not a huge part of the exam, when it does come up, it is essential they are performed fluently and effectively so that the correct diagnosis is made.

In summary, the my key tips to help you pass the MRCGP CSA exam are:

• Give yourself enough time to prepare – I started 6 months before the exam
• Use all opportunities as CSA practice opportunities – surgery, OOH, on call
• Be observed as much as possible – joint surgeries and video surgeries are both helpful
• Actively seek constructive feedback – and use it to develop your technique
• Create an effective structure that works for you and apply it as much as possible
• Get used to working under time pressure – being comfortable with 10 minute consultations really helps
• Don’t let stress on the day change your attitude toward exam consultations – keep calm and carry on

One last point, once you have finished with one patient, don’t analyse or get upset in the exam, move your focus onto the next one and give it your best!

Dr Virji is a GP Registrar (ST3) in Oxford Deanery. She passed the MRCGP CSA exam on her first attempt, and scored 106 marks out of a maximum of 117.

The Emedica MRCGP CSA Course includes teaching on the new CSA mark scheme including the 2012 CSA feedback statements. Each course only takes 6 GP registrars, with a strong emphasis on practice with individual feedback. Practice sessions are donw in groups of 3, allowing each candidate to have 4 mock CSA practice cases. There is detailed, constructive 1 to 1 feedback after each case using the new marking criteria. Our mock CSA cases are done in a realistic setting with professional simulated patients and timed in the same way as the real exam.

MRCGP AKT Exam – High Yield Topics from the January 2012 Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam – High Yield Topics from the January 2012 Exam

Dr Mahibur Rahman

After each MRCGP AKT examination, the examiners release a report highlighting key information from the last exam. This includes pass marks and rates, and also key topics – both those that were answered well, and those that GP trainees performed poorly on. These topics are frequently examined again in the next few sittings of the AKT exam, so it is worth ensuring that you have a good understanding of them.

With the April 2012 MRCGP AKT Exam coming up, we thought it would be helpful to look at the high yield topics from the latest examiner’s report.

Key facts from the January 2012 MRCGP AKT exam:

The top score was 94.5%
The mean score was 73.1%
The lowest score was 42%
The pass mark was 68%
The pass rate was 74.9%

Scores by domain:

Clinical medicine – 74.6%
Evidence interpretation – 69.2%
Organisational – 65.4%

High Yield Topics

The examiners report from the January 2012 diet of the MRCGP AKT exam highlighted the following key topics:

• Hypertension management
• Drug dosage calculations
• Drug management of neurological conditions (e.g. Alzheimer’s)
• Dementia assessment
• Erectile dysfunction
• Childhood development
• Neonatal problems
• Contraception – including LARCs and side effects
• Certification – fit notes, insurance reports
• DVLA guidelines
• Vaccinations

The MRCGP AKT is a comprehensive examinations, so it is important that you cover the entire curriculum. Remember that 80% of the marks are related to applying knowledge relating to clinical medicine in general practice, 10% to evidence interpretation and 10% to the organisational domain.

Emedica Alumni can get a £20 discount off the Emedica MRCGP AKT course by entering this code when booking: alumnimrcgp

Further reading:
Complete January 2012 MRCGP AKT examiners report