MRCGP AKT Exam Revision – High Yield Topics from the October 2014 AKT Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam – High Yield Topics from the October 2014 AKT Exam

Dr Mahibur Rahmanstk64852cor

After each MRCGP AKT examination, the examiners release a report highlighting key information from the last exam. This includes pass marks and rates, and also key topics – both those that were answered well, and those that GP trainees performed poorly on. These topics are frequently examined again in the next few sittings of the AKT exam, so it is worth ensuring that you have a good understanding of them.

As some of you may be starting to think about the January 2015 MRCGP AKT Exam at the moment, we thought it would be helpful to look at the high yield topics from the latest examiners’ report.

Key facts from the October 2014 MRCGP AKT exam:

The top score was 95%
The mean score was 73.9%
The lowest score was 32.5%
The pass mark was 68% (this is one of the lowest it has ever been so far)
The pass rate was 75.7% (this is one of the highest it has been so far)

Scores by domain:

Clinical medicine – 73.6%
Evidence interpretation – 75.4%
Organisational – 75.1%

High Yield Topics

The examiners’ report from this diet of the MRCGP AKT exam highlighted the following key topics:

  • Asthma and COPD
  • Contraception – including LARC
  • Confidentiality and medical reports
  • Digestive health – irritable bowel syndrome
  • Screening programmes
  • Obesity
  • Rare but serious childhood illnesses
  • Antenatal care
  • Incontinence management
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Tumour markers

The MRCGP AKT is a comprehensive examination, so it is important that you cover the entire curriculum. Remember that 80% of the marks are related to applying knowledge relating to clinical medicine in general practice, 10% to evidence interpretation and 10% to the organisational domain.

Emedica Alumni can get a £20 discount off the Emedica MRCGP AKT course by entering this code when booking: alumnimrcgp

Our AKT course offers comprehensive coverage of all 3 domains, and is updated after every exam to take account of high yield topics from the examiners’ feedback reports.

Further reading:
Complete Examiners’ report – October 2014 MRCGP AKT Exam

MRCGP AKT revision – test your knowledge with these 5 AKT questions from the organisational domain

The organisational domain is the area that candidates get the lowest average in the MRCGP AKT exam – it covers a wide range of subjects so can be difficult to prepare for. Test your knowledge with these 5 organisational questions – you can read the answers by MRCGP AKT Revisionclicking the link at the bottom of this post.

1. A 44 year old woman presents with a suspected breast lump.  She accepts the offer of a chaperone during the examination, and a healthcare assistant is present throughout the examination.  With regards to the medical record, which ONE of the following is correct?

A. The fact that a chaperone was present does not need to be noted.

B. The fact that a chaperone was present should be noted, along with their identity (including name and job role).

C. The fact that a chaperone was present should be noted, but no further details are necessary.

D. The fact that a chaperone was present should be noted, along with their job title only.

E. Details of the chaperone should be noted only with the chaperone’s permission.

 

2. One of your patients asks if her daughter has been prescribed the oral contraceptive pill. Her daughter is 14, and was seen on her own a week earlier, and prescribed the combined oral contraceptive pill by one of the other doctors in the practice. Which of the following is the most suitable action?

A. Provide information if the mother has parental responsibility.

B. Explain that you are unable to disclose information without the daughter’s permission.

C. Explain that her daughter is taking contraception but that you cannot divulge details of the exact prescription.

D. Advise the mother to put in a request to access the notes in writing.

E. Provide full details as the mother has a right to know.

 

3. Regarding sharing confidential information relating to knife wounds, which of the following statements is incorrect?

A. In some cases, the name and address of the patient need not be disclosed to the police when initially contacting them.

B. You should usually let the patient know if you are contacting the police.

C. Details of all patients that present with a knife wound should be reported to the police.

D. Where there is a risk of serious harm to others, you can disclose details to the police even if the patient refuses consent.

E. In some cases it is acceptable to disclose confidential details without first seeking the patient’s consent or letting them know you are contacting the police.

 

4. You receive a request for a medical report based on a patient’s notes from an insurance company. The request includes signed consent from the patient to allow you to provide this information. The patient contacts you asking to see a copy of the report before it is sent to the insurance company. The patient does not have any significant medical problems. What is the most appropriate way to deal with this request?

A. Contact the insurance company and request their permission to give the patient a copy of the report.

B. Tell the patient that he should request a copy from the insurance company.

C. Tell the patient that it is not possible for him to see the report, but that he can request access to his own records.

D. Provide a copy of the report to the patient before sending the original to the insurance company.

E. Provide a copy of the report to the patient after sending the original to the insurance company.

 

5. How long must a practice retain confidential electronic medical records after a patient registered at the practice dies?

A. 5 years

B. 10 years

C. 20 years

D. 25 years

E. Indefinitely

Read the answers and explanations and see how you scored!

akt_course

MRCGP AKT exam format and key changes to the exam

MRCGP AKT RevisionDr Mahibur Rahman

The MRCGP AKT exam was introduced in 2007 as part of the new MRCGP examination. Since then it has been through a few minor changes relating to question formats and the passing standard. From October 2014, some important changes are being implemented. This article looks at the exam format, including the new changes.

Exam basics

The Applied Knowledge Test (AKT) is one part of the MRCGP examination. It can be taken in the ST2 year of training or later. It is a computerised test consisting of 200 questions, and can be attempted a maximum of 4 times. The major change being implemented in 2014 is that the time allowed for the exam is being increased by 10 minutes – candidates will now have 3 hours and 10 minutes to complete the exam. The other change is a minor one – an on screen calculator will be available if needed.

Exam content

The exam is based around UK general practice, with all questions being drawn from areas within the RCGP GP curriculum. The breakdown of the questions are as follows:

  • 80% (160 questions) – clinical medicine relevant to general practice
  • 10% (20 questions) – organisational – this includes administrative issues, medicolegal, practice management, GP contract, certification etc.
  • 10% (20 questions) – evidence based practice – statistics, types of study, graphs and charts etc.

Question formats

The majority of questions (about 90%) are of two formats – extended matching questions (EMQs) and single best answer questions (SBA). Candidates sitting the AKT will be familiar with this type of question from the GP Stage 2 assessments used as part of GP recruitment. The remaining question formats include:

  • Algorithm question – testing knowledge of specific guidelines or protocols – sometimes you will be required to drag the correct answer into the relevant box.
  • Picture question – this will have a scenario with a related image – ranging from an investigation, blood result, audiogram, skin lesion, otoscopy or a photo of a clinical sign.
  • Video question – this will involve a short clip (20 – 30 seconds) with a relevant question. This could show an abnormal gait, a test for a sign, a physical abnormality etc.
  • Seminal trial – this will test knowledge of a specific trial that has had a significant impact on general practice.
  • Rank ordering question – this is a relatively new format, and will ask you to order options from best to worst e.g. most secure password to least secure password
  • Short answer question – this will provide a question and then a blank space into which you have to type the correct answer. Typically the answer will be one or two words.
  • Calculation – this may involve calculating a paediatric drug dosage, converting one opioid to a different formulation, or working out the sensitivity or specificity of a test. The maths is usually limited to basic arithmetic, although an no screen calculator is now available.

Preparation

The AKT is a challenging exam, and most candidates will need at least 3 months revision to be able to cover the entire curriculum thoroughly. Combining reading with practising exam level questions to time will help make your revision more effective. The Emedica AKT preparation course offers comprehensive coverage of the curriculum, with a focus on the challenging areas highlighted by examiners from previous sittings. This includes statistics and evidence based practise made simple, the organisational domain, and over 100 core clinical topics including high yield topics from previous examinations. You can get a £20 discount by using the code alumnimrcgp

Useful links:

RCGP AKT Content Guide

MRCGP AKT tips for effective preparation – from a registrar with the highest score in the country

MRCGP AKT Exam Revision – High Yield Topics from the April 2014 AKT Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam – High Yield Topics from the April 2014 AKT Exam

Dr Mahibur RahmanDrug dosage

After each MRCGP AKT examination, the examiners release a report highlighting key information from the last exam. This includes pass marks and rates, and also key topics – both those that were answered well, and those that GP trainees performed poorly on. These topics are frequently examined again in the next few sittings of the AKT exam, so it is worth ensuring that you have a good understanding of them.

As some of you may be starting to think about the October 2014 MRCGP AKT Exam at the moment, we thought it would be helpful to look at the high yield topics from the latest examiners’ report.

Key facts from the April 2014 MRCGP AKT exam:

The top score was 95%
The mean score was 72.2%
The lowest score was 43%
The pass mark was 67% (this is one of the lowest it has ever been so far)
The pass rate was 72.5%

Scores by domain:

Clinical medicine – 72.5%
Evidence interpretation – 73.8%
Organisational – 67.9%

High Yield Topics

The examiners’ report from this diet of the MRCGP AKT exam highlighted the following key topics:

  • Drug dosage calculations
  • Drugs administered by other health professionals
  • Good Medical Practice – 2013 GMC guidance
  • Contraception – including LARC and drug interactions
  • Acute infections – antibiotics and prophylaxis
  • Mental health – diagnosis and management of anxiety
  • Digestive health – irritable bowel and coeliac disease
  • Death and cremation certification
  • Substance misuse – including treatment of withdrawal symptoms
  • Poisoning – symptoms and management
  • Psoriasis – diagnosis and management

The MRCGP AKT is a comprehensive examination, so it is important that you cover the entire curriculum. Remember that 80% of the marks are related to applying knowledge relating to clinical medicine in general practice, 10% to evidence interpretation and 10% to the organisational domain.

Emedica Alumni can get a £20 discount off the Emedica MRCGP AKT course by entering this code when booking: alumnimrcgp

Our AKT course offers comprehensive coverage of all 3 domains, and is updated after every exam to take account of high yield topics from the examiners’ feedback reports.

Further reading:
Complete Examiners’ report – April 2014 MRCGP AKT Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam Revision – High Yield Topics from the January 2014 AKT Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam – High Yield Topics from the January 2014 AKT Exam

Dr Mahibur RahmanHuman eye

After each MRCGP AKT examination, the examiners release a report highlighting key information from the last exam. This includes pass marks and rates, and also key topics – both those that were answered well, and those that GP trainees performed poorly on. These topics are frequently examined again in the next few sittings of the AKT exam, so it is worth ensuring that you have a good understanding of them.

As some of you may be revising for the April 2014 MRCGP AKT Exam at the moment, we thought it would be helpful to look at the high yield topics from the latest examiners’ report.

Key facts from the January 2014 MRCGP AKT exam:

The top score was 95%
The mean score was 75.8%
The lowest score was 39.5%
The pass mark was 70.5% (this is the highest it has ever been so far)
The pass rate was 74.7%

Scores by domain:

Clinical medicine – 76.3%
Evidence interpretation – 74.3%
Organisational – 73.3%

High Yield Topics

The examiners’ report from this diet of the MRCGP AKT exam highlighted the following key topics:

  • Hypertension – NICE guidelines on management
  • Good Medical Practice – 2013 GMC guidance
  • Freedom of Information
  • OTC supplements and interactions with drugs
  • Normal childhood development
  • Eye disease – acute eye problems
  • Certification – fitness to work / Med3
  • Osteoporosis – DEXA scan interpretation
  • Diabetes – diagnosis, management (including insulin therapy)

The MRCGP AKT is a comprehensive examination, so it is important that you cover the entire curriculum. Remember that 80% of the marks are related to applying knowledge relating to clinical medicine in general practice, 10% to evidence interpretation and 10% to the organisational domain.

Emedica Alumni can get a £20 discount off the Emedica MRCGP AKT course by entering this code when booking: alumnimrcgp

Our AKT course offers comprehensive coverage of all 3 domains, and is updated after every exam to take account of high yield topics from the examiners’ feedback reports.

Further reading:
Complete Examiners’ report – January 2014 MRCGP AKT Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam Revision – High Yield Topics from the October 2013 AKT Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam – High Yield Topics from the October 2013 AKT Exam

Dr Mahibur Rahman

After each MRCGP AKT examination, the examiners release a report highlighting key information from the last exam. This includes pass marks and rates, and also key topics – both those that were answered well, and those that GP trainees performed poorly on. These topics are frequently examined again in the next few sittings of the AKT exam, so it is worth ensuring that you have a good understanding of them.

As some of you may be revising for the January 2014 MRCGP AKT Exam at the moment, we thought it would be helpful to look at the high yield topics from the latest examiners’ report.156204109

Key facts from the October 2013 MRCGP AKT exam:

The top score was 94%
The mean score was 73.2%
The lowest score was 43.5%
The pass mark was 67%
The pass rate was 76.1% (this is one of the highest pass rates in recent years)

Scores by domain:

Clinical medicine – 72.9%
Evidence interpretation – 69.4%
Organisational – 79.3%

High Yield Topics

The examiners’ report from this diet of the MRCGP AKT exam highlighted the following key topics:

  • Drug interactions for common drugs – statins, macrolides, oral anticoagulants
  • Management of type 2 diabetes
  • Psoriasis – diagnosis and management
  • Oral contraception and LARC
  • Pre-employment vaccinations
  • Incontinence
  • Peripheral vascular disease
  • Dementia – management and diagnosis
  • Diabetes – diagnosis, management, interpreting diabetic blood results

The MRCGP AKT is a comprehensive examination, so it is important that you cover the entire curriculum. Remember that 80% of the marks are related to applying knowledge relating to clinical medicine in general practice, 10% to evidence interpretation and 10% to the organisational domain.

Emedica Alumni can get a £20 discount off the Emedica MRCGP AKT course by entering this code when booking: alumnimrcgp

Our AKT course offers comprehensive coverage of all 3 domains, and is updated after every exam to take account of high yield topics from the examiners’ feedback reports.

Further reading:
Complete Examiners’ report – October 2013 exam

MRCGP AKT Exam Revision – High Yield Topics from the May 2013 AKT Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam – High Yield Topics from the May 2013 AKT Exam

Dr Mahibur Rahman

After each MRCGP AKT examination, the examiners release a report highlighting key information from the last exam. This includes pass marks and rates, and also key topics – both those that were answered well, and those that GP trainees performed poorly on. These topics are frequently 135018281examined again in the next few sittings of the AKT exam, so it is worth ensuring that you have a good understanding of them.

As some of you may be starting your revision for the October 2013 MRCGP AKT Exam, we thought it would be helpful to look at the high yield topics from the latest examiners’ report.

Key facts from the May 2013 MRCGP AKT exam:

The top score was 97%
The mean score was 72.74%
The lowest score was 38%
The pass mark was 68%
The pass rate was 71.4%

Scores by domain:

Clinical medicine – 72.6%
Evidence interpretation – 76.0%
Organisational – 70.4%

High Yield Topics

The AKT summary report after each AKT exam usually highlights topics that were either not answered well by many candidates, or that although were tackled well, were important enough to be mentioned by the examiners. This is usually a clue that these topics will be retested in the next few sittings of the exam.

The examiners’ report from this diet of the MRCGP AKT exam highlighted the following key topics:

  • Management of hypertension
  • Fitness to work certification (sick notes)
  • Drug interactions
  • Skin lesions – recognising common and serious conditions
  • Screening programmes
  • Drug monitoring – blood tests
  • Enteral feeding – including complications
  • Emergency contraception
  • Diabetes – diagnosis, management, interpreting diabetic blood results

The MRCGP AKT is a comprehensive examination, so it is important that you cover the entire curriculum. Remember that 80% of the marks are related to applying knowledge relating to clinical medicine in general practice, 10% to evidence interpretation and 10% to the organisational domain.

Emedica Alumni can get a £20 discount off the Emedica MRCGP AKT course by entering this code when booking: alumnimrcgp

Further reading:
Complete May 2013 AKT Summary report